Photos of NYC in the early 1970s

Feb. 22nd, 2017 09:56 pm
[syndicated profile] kottke_org_feed

Posted by Jason Kottke

Vergara NYC

Vergara NYC

Vergara NYC

In the early 1970s, Camilo José Vergara trained his camera on scenes of everyday street life in New York City. His photographs captured kids playing on the street, subway cars before graffiti, sections of the Bronx that look bombed out, and the construction of the World Trade Center in progress.

See also his Tracking Time project, specific locations around the US photographed repeatedly over periods of up to 40 years. Vergara was awarded a MacArthur Genius Grant in 2002 for this work.

Tags: Camilo Jose Vergara   NYC   photography

Two Great Vids from the Festivids

Feb. 22nd, 2017 03:51 pm
jesse_the_k: Macro photo of left eye of my mostly black border collie mutt (Default)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Vidding defined )

Although the annual Festivids discussion and commenting happen on Dreamwidth (mirrored on Livejournal, Tumblr, IRC and so forth), the vids themselves are posted in many places. In my brief experience, the most lasting is Festivids' own site.

For now, all the 2016 Festivids are here
http://fv-poster.dreamwidth.org/336383.html

and for the future, visit
http://www.festivids.net/festivids/festivids-2016

The two highlights for me: A Better Son/Daughter and Get Better )
[syndicated profile] kottke_org_feed

Posted by Jason Kottke

Saddest Radiohead Song

Radiohead is data scientist Charlie Thompson’s favorite band and he recently employed his professional skills to determine Radiohead’s most depressing songs and albums. Using data from Spotify and Genius, he analyzed and weighted how sad each song sounded musically and the sadness of the lyrics.

While valence serves as an out-of-the box measure of musical sentiment, the emotions behind song lyrics are much more elusive. To find the most depressing song, I used sentiment analysis to pick out words associated with sadness. Specifically, I used tidytext and the NRC lexicon, based on a crowd-sourced project by the National Research Council Canada. This lexicon contains an array of emotions (sadness, joy, anger, surprise, etc.) and the words determined to most likely elicit them.

Unsurprisingly, True Love Waits is Radiohead’s saddest song and Moon Shaped Pool its saddest album. You can play with this interactive chart to see all of the results. I thought Videotape would score lower on the Gloom Index…along with True Love Waits, it’s my go-to Radiohead song for wallowing in the darkness of my life. (via @RichardWestenra)

Tags: Charlie Thompson   music   Radiohead

Narnia fanfic

Feb. 22nd, 2017 12:26 pm
rachelmanija: (Default)
[personal profile] rachelmanija
For the Chocolate Box exchange, which focuses on romantic or friendship pairings, I wrote The Gift for [personal profile] aurilly's request for Emeth/Tirian from The Last Battle. If you don't remember him, Emeth was the honorable young Calormene officer, who made a disproportionate impression in a very brief appearance, at least on those of us who like noble warriors.
[syndicated profile] kottke_org_feed

Posted by Jason Kottke

Trappist 1

Today NASA announced the discovery of seven planets “that could harbor life” around a dwarf star called Trappist-1.

The planets orbit a dwarf star named Trappist-1, about 40 light years, or about 235 trillion miles, from Earth. That is quite close, and by happy accident, the orientation of the orbits of the seven planets allows them to be studied in great detail.

One or more of the exoplanets - planets around stars other than the sun - in this new system could be at the right temperature to be awash in oceans of water, astronomers said, based on the distance of the planets from the dwarf star.

“This is the first time so many planets of this kind are found around the same star,” said Michael Gillon, an astronomer at the University of Liege in Belgium and the leader of an international team that has been observing Trappist-1.

Here’s the paper published in Nature.

Tags: astronomy   NASA   science   space

Home!

Feb. 22nd, 2017 09:50 am
terriko: (Default)
[personal profile] terriko
Made it home from India without incident, by which I mean my green card was accepted at the border and no one asked me to unlock my phone. It's weird how I just went on a trip to a country where I couldn't drink the water and the front page of the newspaper had multiple rape cases and an acid attack against women and yet, crossing the US border was *still* the most scary part with the constantly changing rules.

The trip was great. I saw so many things I never expected to see, ate so much delicious food, and met so many people that I'm not sure I'm ever going to get everyone's names straight. The PyCon Pune conference was *amazing*. I keynoted to a room of over 500 people, and I've never had such an engaged audience! I did code sprints with people who were awesome, too -- we discovered that Mailman had something like 9 different dev setup guides, many of which were out of date, and yet somehow everyone got things up and running *and* folk helped patch up the docs to be consistent. If you ever get a chance, seriously, go.
[syndicated profile] softwarecarpentry_feed

Wednesday, Mar 1, 3pm PST / 6pm EST / 11pm UTC / 9am AEST (next day)

On Wednesday, March 1, the Carpentries will host the second of three Career Pathway Panels, where members of the Carpentry communities can hear from three individuals in careers that leverage teaching experience and Carpentry skills. (Note: The date of this second panel was shifted from the originally-proposed date of Feb 22 due to scheduling considerations.)

Anyone who has taught at a Carpentry workshop in the last three months is invited to join, and should register by Monday, February 27 in order to be invited to the call. Registration is limited to 20 people per session, so please only commit if you are sure you will attend. Attendees can register for any number of these sessions. Each session will last one hour and will feature a different set of panelists. The final session will occur on Tuesday, March 21 at 3pm PST (panelists TBA).

For the March 1 session, we are excited to be joined by the below panelists!

Marianne Corvellec

Marianne earned a PhD in statistical physics in 2012. She now works as a data scientist at CRIM, a semi-public research centre in Montréal, Canada. She specializes in data analysis and software development. Before joining CRIM, she worked at three different web startups. She speaks or teaches at local and international tech events on a regular basis. Her interests include data visualization, signal processing, inverse-problem approach, assessment, free software, open standards, best practices, and community management.

Bernhard Konrad

Bernhard attended a SWC workshop in 2012 during his graduate studies, and was immediately fascinated by the world of opportunities and productivity that these software tools opened up. He taught a dozen workshops since, and started to work on software-related personal side projects. Bernhard then went to Insight Data Science, a Data Science fellowship in Silicon Valley. After interviewing with a few companies and after a complicated work permit process, he started his job as a Software Engineer at Google in early 2016. There, he develops internal tools for engineering productivity.

Aleksandra Pawlik

Aleksandra Pawlik is the Research Communities Manager at the New Zealand eScience Infrastructure (NeSI). Before joining NeSI in 2016 she worked for three years at the University of Manchester, UK for the Software Sustainability Institute where she was leading the Institute’s training activities. Software and Data Carpentry has been always a big part of her professional activities and allowed Aleksandra develop a range of skills, understand the research ecosystem and meet a number of amazing and inspirational people.

The civics test for US naturalization

Feb. 22nd, 2017 04:56 pm
[syndicated profile] kottke_org_feed

Posted by Jason Kottke

Among the requirements that all immigrants must meet to become a naturalized US citizen is a civics test covering US history and government. The test contains 100 questions, 10 of which are verbally posed by a Citizenship and Immigration Services officer…no multiple choice. Applicants must answer 6 out of 10 correctly to pass. The questions include:

What is the supreme law of the land?
What is freedom of religion?
What stops one branch of government from becoming too powerful?
The House of Representatives has how many voting members?
What is the name of the President of the United States now?
Under our Constitution, some powers belong to the states. What is one power of the states?
What are two ways that Americans can participate in their democracy?
The Federalist Papers supported the passage of the U.S. Constitution. Name one of the writers.
When must all men register for the Selective Service?
Name one war fought by the United States in the 1800s.
What was one important thing that Abraham Lincoln did?
Why does the flag have 13 stripes?
Before he was President, Eisenhower was a general. What war was he in?
Name one of the two longest rivers in the United States.
Name two national U.S. holidays.

You can take a 20-question multiple choice test on the USCIS website or if you want to see how many you can answer out of 100 with no multiple choice, I knocked up a Google Sheets version here — access is read-only but you can make a copy and take the test by choosing File / Make a copy… from the menu. Here’s a full list of the questions and suggested answers to check your work. Without studying, some of the questions are more difficult than you’d think, particularly if your last political science and American history classes were 25 years ago in high school.

And like all tests, this one is imperfect.1 In 2001, Dafna Linzer wrote about her test-taking experience.

Then there is Question 12: What is the “rule of law”?

I showed it to lawyers and law professors. They were stumped.

There are four acceptable answers: “Everyone must follow the law”; “Leaders must obey the law”; “Government must obey the law”; “No one is above the law.”

Judge Richard Posner, the constitutional scholar who serves on the U.S. Court of Appeals in Chicago, was unhappy. “These are all incorrect,” he wrote me. “The rule of law means that judges decide cases ‘without respect of persons,’ that is, without considering the social status, attractiveness, etc. of the parties or their lawyers.”

The Simpsons lampooned this aspect of the test in 1996 when Apu answered a question about the Civil War2 during his civics test.

Examiner: “Alright, here’s your last question: What was the cause of the Civil War?”

Apu: “Actually there were numerous causes. Aside from the obvious schism between the abolitionists and the anti-abolitionists, economic factors both domestic and international…”

Examiner: “Hey, hey…”

Apu: “Yep?”

Examiner: “Just… just say ‘slavery’”.

Apu: “Slavery it is, sir.”

This would never happen in a million years, but I would love for someone to sit down with Donald Trump to see how many of these he could answer. Like I said, if you haven’t studied, some of the questions are not that easy. But surely the President of the United States should be able to get almost all of them correct…

  1. I was always good at tests in school because I learned early on the difference between the correct answer and the answer you’re supposed to give. Most of the time, they’re the same but not always.

  2. The question from the actual test reads “Name one problem that led to the Civil War” and the three suggested answers are “slavery”, “economic reasons”, and “states’ rights”.

Tags: geography   immigration   politics   USA
[syndicated profile] astoriareddit_feed

Posted by /u/Captaintripps

What are you making for yourself at home? Gourmet or just gory?

Last night I made a chicken chilli. Caramelized the onions in goose fat and used home made turkey stock to stew everything in. It came out amazing.

submitted by /u/Captaintripps
[link] [comments]
[syndicated profile] sfconservancyblog_feed
Photo of Christoph Hellwig speaking at DebConf 2015

Christoph Hellwig is a Linux developer, responsible for the code for several filesystems and the NVM Express drive. He’s a member of Conservancy’s GPL Compliance Project for Linux Developers and the plaintiff in the case against VMWare, which still awaits appeal. We recently had a chance to catch up with him to hear how he got started working on Linux, what advice he would give newcomers, and why he supports Conservancy’s work.

Q: How did you become interested in Linux? Is there a contribution you are most proud of?

CH: When I was a kid in Germany I started using Usenet and got myself into programming more or less by accident. That lead to learning about Linux and installing it at home. Soon after I started hacking kernel to make the sound card in my computer work under Linux.

Auto-generated maps of fantasy worlds

Feb. 22nd, 2017 03:39 pm
[syndicated profile] kottke_org_feed

Posted by Jason Kottke

Uncharted Atlas

Uncharted Atlas

Uncharted Atlas

Martin O’Leary is a research scientist who studies glaciers, but in his spare time, he built Uncharted Atlas, a program that auto-generates maps of fantasy lands (like from Game of Thrones or LOTR) and posts them to a Twitter account. The explanation of how the terrain is generated is quite interesting and includes embedded map generators that you can play around with (i.e. prepare to lose about 20 minutes to this).

There are loads of articles on the internet which describe terrain generation, and they almost all use some variation on a fractal noise approach, either directly (by adding layers of noise functions), or indirectly (e.g. through midpoint displacement). These methods produce lots of fine detail, but the large-scale structure always looks a bit off. Features are attached in random ways, with no thought to the processes which form landscapes. I wanted to try something a little bit different.

There are a few different stages to the generator. First we build up a height-map of the terrain, and do things like routing water flow over the surface. Then we can render the ‘physical’ portion of the map. Finally we can place cities and ‘regions’ on the map, and place their labels.

And here’s how the languages for the place names are generated; each map has its own generated language so all of the place names are consistant with each other and different from those regions shown on other maps.

I wanted to produce something which was a step above the usual alphabetic soup of generated placenames, and which was capable of producing recognisably distinct languages. The initial idea was that different regions of each map would have different languages, but I abandoned this because it was too hard to make it clear that this was what was going on, while still having the languages themselves be interesting.

The problem is to generate something like what the constructed languages (conlang) community call a ‘naming language’. This is a light sketch of a language, focusing purely on the parts which are necessary to produce names. So there’s little to no grammar, but a good sense of what the language sounds like, and how it’s written.

Tags: language   maps   Martin O’Leary
[syndicated profile] strangehorizons_all_feed

Posted by Nina Allan

Sometimes I hear them being chased and they’re never caught. Or are they different ones? They shriek, are scared of what’s chasing them. They run, fly, will do anything to make their escape. It must be other girls each night, must, it must be, because nobody could escape, lest anyone deceive themselves, it is impossible to escape. One night I shouted to the desperate one, but she didn’t hear me. I prefer not to shout any more, it makes no sense and makes me ill. I am ill. I am so afraid. I’m so afraid and can’t shout Mom. It’s a cry I can’t utter, because I don’t possess that word.

Originally published (as Antes) in the author’s native Mexico in 1989, Before appeared for the first time in English only in 2016, in a translation by Peter Bush from Deep Vellum. Carmen Boullosa has published eighteen novels to date, as well as poetry, plays, and journalism. Celebrated in Latin America, as a non-Anglophone author she is less well known outside of her homeland: a familiar story, especially among women writers. With this newly available novella, a ghost story hidden inside a memoir (or is that the other way around?), we can finally add her name to those of others such as Clarice Lispector and Angelica Gorodischer, women with an important part to play in shaping our understanding of the possibilities of speculative fiction.

We begin with a statement of ghosthood. Our unnamed narrator presents us with a vision of children playing by a lakeside, then claims that she was once "like those children … like one of those awkward children," but that she is now "cut off from their world forever." She goes on to describe her mother on the day of her own birth:

That day she was paler than usual and when I saw her for the first time every small feature reflected the fear I never imagined would spring upon me and lock its jaw. Her name was completely different to mine. More resonant, a name I’d give to a son if I had one. Her name was Esther. Although I’d always seen her in a very distinctive light, I loved her as much as if she were my mother.

This simultaneous claiming and rejecting of Esther, a passionate love twinned with terrible foreboding, are the dual leitmotifs that characterise Boullosa’s novella and help us form an understanding of its themes and intentions. Our narrator’s insistence that she has "always" seen Esther in a very distinctive light must lead us to the conclusion that this is no ordinary memoir, no ordinary coming-of-age story. It is written after the event, from an adult perspective of knowingness. But what is this fear that "springs upon [her] and locks its jaw"? Children are afraid of many things, largely because the world is still mysterious to them and therefore terrifying. Our narrator’s fear though seems born not out of ignorance, but out of foreknowledge. This fear soon takes on tangible presence, in the form of footsteps that seem to pursue her everywhere, and relentlessly, and that only she can hear. Early in the novella, our narrator remembers an episode in which she attempts to rescue a turtle destined to be turned into soup for Esther’s birthday:

I stroked her shell with her head resting on my shoulder, stroked her rough feet that were too short, and we could no longer hear the noise we were pursuing. Not one step more. Confidently, feeling powerful, I took the turtle to the kitchen terrace. I opened the door, left her on the ground, soothed and I think also exhausted after her long run. I gave her a little water in a dish, shut the door and went back to bed, surrounded by a pleasant silence.

The turtle is both a comfort to her and a mission, protected and protector. In saving it from a cruel and untimely death, our narrator feels she has also saved herself, outrun the mysterious footsteps of fate, only later to see a vision of the turtle, decapitated and bloody, the safe space of the terrace violated, the soup made. Further memories blossom, a sinister accretion of microaggressions, misunderstandings, and reversals, culminating in an episode of school bullying in which she becomes the victim of three older girls who single her out for a painful humiliation:

I didn’t see them leave. Without them the toilets seemed darker. I took my sweater off and pulled up my school blouse. By twisting my head, I could see my nylon petticoat in the mirror, burnt, a gaping hole revealing an expanse of back. As I pulled my blouse up, the soaking ball of paper fell heavily to the floor under the weight of trapped water. I straightened my clothes. I looked for my panties and couldn’t find them on the ceiling or on the floor. I returned to my math class and tried to concentrate on fractions.

The world inhabited by our narrator is itself a duality: comfortable yet dangerous, familiar yet unpredictable and deeply disturbing. In Boullosa’s hands, ordinary domestic objects take on the characteristics of weapons, harmless banter becomes insidious and threatening, ink stains on a white blouse metamorphose into poisonous spiders. Surrounded by family and friends who cherish and shelter her, our narrator still cannot help but feel alienated, constantly terrified, and bleakly alone. In a world where the future lies only a step away, even games become a matter of life and death. The theme of pursuit is a constant, those mysterious footsteps, harbingers of fate, death, adulthood, and change, are inescapable. Above all, our narrator fears losing the ability to dream, a death of the imagination that seems inextricably linked with the onset of puberty, which in its turn appears as a reminder and recapitulation of the unresolved trauma of her mother’s death. The story culminates in the death of the narrator as she starts her period:

I saw Dad come out and shout my name in the garden. I heard him run to the phone, I saw him (how did I see this?) find me in bed, in my pajamas, with my clothes scattered untidily over the floor … I was asleep, or rather, she, his daughter, was sleeping forever, in flannel pants soaked in blood, her face set in an undeservedly serene expression.

The doctor could not tell him why I had died.

Yet the narrator’s very knowingness leads us to question its reality. Is her demise real, or merely symbolic, a passage to adulthood? Would our narrator, in the end, rather believe herself to be a ghost than wake up motherless in a world where she can no longer access the magical, the speculative, the ineffable, secret life of the imagination?

The introduction to the Deep Vellum edition of Before, by the celebrated essayist Phillip Lopate, perfectly describes Antes as "a haunting and haunted novella … teetering between humour and panic." He also reminds us that Boullosa, like our unnamed narrator, was born in Mexico City in 1954, and that her mother died when Boullosa was just fifteen. "Turning herself into a ghost," Lopate says, "and refusing to acknowledge that her mother is her mother would be two ways to avoid the full impact of that grief":

I peered out of the door and saw two nurses carrying Esther on a stretcher. Esther (can I say Mom at this point in the story?) turned her head around to see me. I ran after her. The stretcher-bearers stopped. Her head turned around, lips half-open, she said, "Poor little thing," and burst into tears as well; oh Esther, I loved you so much, so much, Mom, Mom, Mom, Mom …

Reading Before is like being made to live inside someone else’s dream. Not the artificial and typically dull "dream sequence" so beloved of certain horror novelists, in which dreams are used as the deus ex machina to resolve those parts of the plot that could not otherwise be logically explained. Boullosa’s writing miraculously encapsulates the texture of a real dream, in which obscure and inexplicably unsettling images wrestle with everyday normality in a battle for supremacy within a landscape that seems forever on the verge of dissolution. If Before is a narrative of doubling, the novella’s key duality is that liminal space that exists for the writer between art and life, between memoir and story. It is almost impossible not to read Before as an act of mourning, a final, wrenching love letter from a daughter to a mother who is no longer in this world. Equally though, it is an artist’s meditation on the fragile nature of creativity itself, on the necessity of retaining the instinctive, the visionary, the childlike, the melancholic, those sparks of the monstrous and the divine that are the building blocks of a writer’s process. On the fear of those insights waning, or dying altogether.

As an indication of Boullosa’s intentions for Antes, we need look no further than the novella’s epigraph, by Rubèn Dario:

The pain of not being what I should have been, the
Loss of the realm that was made for me,
The thought that at one moment I might not have
Been, the dream my life has known since I was born …

At fewer than a hundred pages, Before is a slim work. Yet in the complexity of its vision, its richness of expression, its hypnotic power both to enthrall and to appall, it carries the purpose and depth of meaning of works three times its length. That Boullosa has chosen the ghost story as the vehicle for so personal an elegy seems entirely natural and right. That a ghost must by its nature exist simultaneously in two worlds—the world of matter and the world of the imagination—is something universally understood. As a metaphor for the life of the writer—both here and not here—the ghost trope is pleasingly unsettling. The clusters of magical-realist imagery that jostle for attention across the pages of Before—headless turtles, enchanted wardrobes, sisters who claim to be angels, and fathers who claim to be kidnappers—are similarly potent, similarly effective in conveying our young narrator’s heightened state of awareness, a grief that is the wellspring of story, and that cannot be assuaged.


[syndicated profile] datacarpentry_feed

Wednesday, Mar 1, 3pm PST / 6pm EST / 11pm UTC / 9am AEST (next day)

On Wednesday, March 1, the Carpentries will host the second of three Career Pathway Panels, where members of the Carpentry communities can hear from three individuals in careers that leverage teaching experience and Carpentry skills. (Note: The date of this second panel was shifted from the originally-proposed date of Feb 22 due to scheduling considerations.)

Anyone who has taught at a Carpentry workshop in the last three months is invited to join, and should register by Monday, February 27 in order to be invited to the call. Registration is limited to 20 people per session, so please only commit if you are sure you will attend. Attendees can register for any number of these sessions. Each session will last one hour and will feature a different set of panelists. The final session will occur on Tuesday, March 21 at 3pm PST (panelists TBA).

For the March 1 session, we are excited to be joined by the below panelists!

Marianne Corvellec

Marianne earned a PhD in statistical physics in 2012. She now works as a data scientist at CRIM, a semi-public research centre in Montréal, Canada. She specializes in data analysis and software development. Before joining CRIM, she worked at three different web startups. She speaks or teaches at local and international tech events on a regular basis. Her interests include data visualization, signal processing, inverse-problem approach, assessment, free software, open standards, best practices, and community management.

Bernhard Konrad

Bernhard attended a SWC workshop in 2012 during his graduate studies, and was immediately fascinated by the world of opportunities and productivity that these software tools opened up. He taught a dozen workshops since, and started to work on software-related personal side projects. Bernhard then went to Insight Data Science, a Data Science fellowship in Silicon Valley. After interviewing with a few companies and after a complicated work permit process, he started his job as a Software Engineer at Google in early 2016. There, he develops internal tools for engineering productivity.

Aleksandra Pawlik

Aleksandra Pawlik is the Research Communities Manager at the New Zealand eScience Infrastructure (NeSI). Before joining NeSI in 2016 she worked for three years at the University of Manchester, UK for the Software Sustainability Institute where she was leading the Institute’s training activities. Software and Data Carpentry has been always a big part of her professional activities and allowed Aleksandra develop a range of skills, understand the research ecosystem and meet a number of amazing and inspirational people.

Do Lays A Flavor

Feb. 22nd, 2017 03:45 pm
copperbadge: (Default)
[personal profile] copperbadge
Do Lays A Flavor:

GUYS IT’S BACK. Lays is once again soliciting for flavor suggestions at http://ift.tt/1gQCrAV . I’ve already turned in my ode to the hot dog potato chip. Go ye and suggest a flavor! (Then reblog this or comment and share your flavor so we can cheer you on.)

from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2kMeery
via IFTTT
[syndicated profile] jenny_ryan_feed

Posted by tunabananas

storyline:

A year after the arrest of FBI-style Robin Hood and reduce it to the public to receive praise from the magic game, the performance of the four horsemen, technology arising again with hope for a comeback captain of unethical revealed. No one other than the fact that someone in the act disappeared after Walter Mabry, tech magic, because he can not be in danger of horsemen in the robbery, dikoyakkannyalahpakaiannya. And Ihoping to clear their names and last underwent reveal the mastermind INCREMENTUMpost all.

am:

: Matroska

File: MiB

: 2h 9mn

: 3235 Kbps

: BluRay

Encoder ……. JYK

Young

video:

Video: AVC

Video: x264 core 148 r2638 7.59921 million

: 2850 Kbps

Frame: Yes

: 1920 pixels

: 1 to 80 pixels

aspect: 16: 9

Audio # 1:

: 3-n

: 384 Kbps

: 6 channels

Sampling: Eli

Young

  • Now You See Me 2 Movie Online
  • Now You See Me 2 online movie free 1080p
  • Now You See Me 2 movie

12 1 User Rating

[syndicated profile] jenny_ryan_feed

Posted by tunabananas

storyline:

A year after the arrest of FBI-style Robin Hood and reduce it to the public to receive praise from the magic game, the performance of the four horsemen, technology arising again with hope for a comeback captain of unethical revealed. No one other than the fact that someone in the act disappeared after Walter Mabry, tech magic, because he can not be in danger of horsemen in the robbery, dikoyakkannyalahpakaiannya. And Ihoping to clear their names and last underwent reveal the mastermind INCREMENTUMpost all.

am:

: Matroska

File: MiB

: 2h 9mn

: 3235 Kbps

: BluRay

Encoder ……. JYK

Young

video:

Video: AVC

Video: x264 core 148 r2638 7.59921 million

: 2850 Kbps

Frame: Yes

: 1920 pixels

: 1 to 80 pixels

aspect: 16: 9

Audio # 1:

: 3-n

: 384 Kbps

: 6 channels

Sampling: Eli

Young

  • Now You See Me 2 Movie Online
  • Now You See Me 2 online movie free 1080p
  • Now You See Me 2 movie

12 1 User Rating

[syndicated profile] jenny_ryan_feed

Posted by tunabananas

storyline:

A year after the arrest of FBI-style Robin Hood and reduce it to the public to receive praise from the magic game, the performance of the four horsemen, technology arising again with hope for a comeback captain of unethical revealed. No one other than the fact that someone in the act disappeared after Walter Mabry, tech magic, because he can not be in danger of horsemen in the robbery, dikoyakkannyalahpakaiannya. And Ihoping to clear their names and last underwent reveal the mastermind INCREMENTUMpost all.

am:

: Matroska

File: MiB

: 2h 9mn

: 3235 Kbps

: BluRay

Encoder ……. JYK

Young

video:

Video: AVC

Video: x264 core 148 r2638 7.59921 million

: 2850 Kbps

Frame: Yes

: 1920 pixels

: 1 to 80 pixels

aspect: 16: 9

Audio # 1:

: 3-n

: 384 Kbps

: 6 channels

Sampling: Eli

Young

  • Now You See Me 2 Movie Online
  • Now You See Me 2 online movie free 1080p
  • Now You See Me 2 movie

12 1 User Rating

[syndicated profile] jenny_ryan_feed

Posted by tunabananas

storyline:

A year after the arrest of FBI-style Robin Hood and reduce it to the public to receive praise from the magic game, the performance of the four horsemen, technology arising again with hope for a comeback captain of unethical revealed. No one other than the fact that someone in the act disappeared after Walter Mabry, tech magic, because he can not be in danger of horsemen in the robbery, dikoyakkannyalahpakaiannya. And Ihoping to clear their names and last underwent reveal the mastermind INCREMENTUMpost all.

am:

: Matroska

File: MiB

: 2h 9mn

: 3235 Kbps

: BluRay

Encoder ……. JYK

Young

video:

Video: AVC

Video: x264 core 148 r2638 7.59921 million

: 2850 Kbps

Frame: Yes

: 1920 pixels

: 1 to 80 pixels

aspect: 16: 9

Audio # 1:

: 3-n

: 384 Kbps

: 6 channels

Sampling: Eli

Young

  • Now You See Me 2 Movie Online
  • Now You See Me 2 online movie free 1080p
  • Now You See Me 2 movie

12 1 User Rating

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