brainwane: My smiling face, in front of a wall and a brown poster. (hackerschool)
I'm going to OSCON in Austin, Texas to represent Zulip in the Open Source Alley -- would enjoy meeting any Dreamwidth folks there tomorrow! Or if you have free time in Austin Friday in the morning or afternoon, I'd enjoy hanging out.
brainwane: My smiling face in front of a brick wall, May 2015. (Default)
I saw Antitrust on an airplane in the summer of 2001. I didn't leave with a high opinion of it; it seemed campy fun.

I found a used DVD at a local thrift shop last weekend, so last night I watched it with my spouse.

It actually holds up better than I predicted on a technobabble level! We freeze-framed a lot and marvelled at how reasonable (mostly) all the command-line stuff was. And as mainstream fiction movies go, I think there still hasn't been a movie that takes the conflict between proprietary and open source software more seriously than Antitrust (I'd welcome corrections on this point).

details, including spoilers )

At some point in the future I will watch the special features and listen to the commentary. (One of the special features is a music video for the Everclear song that plays at the end of the movie. The music video includes clips from the movie. It's like Everclear made a vid!) I imagine I'll have more thoughts then.
brainwane: My smiling face in front of a brick wall, May 2015. (Default)
Summary: Have 90 minutes, between now and April 3rd, to kindly critique less-English-fluent writers over the internet? I'd love your help.

I work with a lot of non-US-based younger people (often high school or college-aged) who contribute to the open source community over the Internet. Many of them volunteer as coders in the hopes of getting internships that will help them with their careers. The engineering education system in some of these countries, especially India, doesn't help students develop their written English skills very much; many of these students are at a disadvantage in these competitive internship application programs because their written English has poor grammar, phrasing, and punctuation. Every year I see tons of these engineering students applying for internships, and I can see how English issues in their bug reports, commit messages, code comments, application proposals, e-mails, and chat messages make it harder for them to get their ideas across.

Some kind, nonjudgmental help would go a long way for these volunteers. And it'd help level the playing field a bit.

I've successfully run little 90-minute online writing clinics via chat or collaborative document-editing platforms like Google Docs or EtherPad, where 3-4 participants bring short writing samples and I live-edit them and tell the students how to improve. They always get a lot out of it, and I can see the improvement in their writing afterwards. And when I've had time to edit their internship proposals in depth, it's helped them think better about what they actually aim to do.

Today, one of the open source projects I care a lot about, Zulip, got accepted as a mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code for the second year in a row. I've been contracting as a community coordinator for Zulip for about a year, and I love that it's a project where we nurture new contributors inclusively and have high standards of engineering rigor. (I profiled the maintainer, Tim Abbott, in this post about kind negative code review.) We have dozens of new contributors in our chat who want to work with us, and we'll be getting more between now and the April 3rd application deadline. We won't be able to accept all of them. But they'll all come away from the application process as better engineers, and I'd like for that to include better English skills that'll help them persuade, lead, get better jobs, and have better chances of succeeding as entrepreneurs.

So if you could spare 90 minutes sometime between now and April 3rd, and if you have a knack for proofreading in English and have a tolerable internet connection for web browser-based textual chat, let me know and I can probably set something up that suits your schedule. It's fine if you've never done this before and it's fine if you're not a programmer and don't know programming jargon. I'll set up the "room", and I'll be there and you can backchannel with me. You'll be helping one of the best open source communities I know, and you'll be helping make sure non-G7 voices in STEM get heard and listened to.

Leave a comment below telling me how to contact you and anything you know about your upcoming schedule, and I'll take it from there!

Edited to add: I've set this entry so people without Dreamwidth accounts are able to post comments, and so that only I will be able to see the comments (comments are screened), so you can put your contact info in there and it won't be public. And please feel free to pass this link on to other groups/people who are kind and collaboratively inclined, and repost/publicize it elsewhere!

Edited March 13th to add: I have received several offers of help -- thank you! -- and I'm getting back to everyone who's commented, albeit not always within a day or two. I'm open to more offers, but I might not be able to schedule you till April. And because of the number of offers of help I've gotten, I'm opening up the pool of learners a little bit -- I'm talking with the open source community managers at Mozilla and Wikimedia to let them know that their communities can take advantage of this opportunity, too. Thank you so much.
brainwane: several colorful scribbles in the vague shape of a jellyfish (jellyfish)
[fake example]

Name:

Samplemana Hariharapplicant


Project idea:

I'm interested in an Outreachy project where I implant parrots
with Zulip clients so they can repeat what I say into my living
room. This would be via an integration that would live in the
zulip/parrot repository (a new GitHub project I would create). I
figure, since you can teach parrots to say things, I want parrots
to speak aloud the traffic in a Zulip channel, so I can get audio
notifications in my living room, and I like hearing the sound of
the words I say, so I also want to be able to get parrots to say
a single user's words (my own), so I'll also implement
user-specific filtering. I only speak English and I don't think I
can manage supporting multiple languages right now but maybe I
will be able to do that towards the end of the 12 weeks.


Deliverables:

* bridge code and tests in the zulip/parrot repo
* documentation in zulip/parrot/docs
* 4 blog posts


Schedule:

November 8-December 6: acquire parrot, acquire cage and food, get
Digital Ocean virtual machine running

Dec 1 [starting early to make up for late December vacation] - Dec 6:
get test frameworks running, including parrot emulator

Dec 7 - Dec 15: write first test and initial functionality and docs
for stream-to-parrot syndication

Dec 15: first blog post

Dec 16 - 24: get initial test, functionality, and docs merged into
trunk, and get started on tests, functionality, and docs for emoji
support

December 25-January 1: vacation

January 2 - 14: finish tests, functionality, and docs for emoji
support, get merged into trunk

Jan 15: second blog post

Jan 16 - 18: set up multiparrot (buy a second parrot, cage, and food)

Jan 19 - Jan 30: write tests, functionality, and docs for
user-specific parrot syndication (each user's posts spoken by a
different parrot), get merged into trunk

Feb 1 - 9: fix bugs and feed bugs to parrot

Feb 10: third blog post

Feb 11 - 28: write user docs about caring for parrot, merge into
trunk; deploy in larger environment with many streams, users, and
parrots, and fix ensuing problems

March 1: fourth blog post

March 2 - 6: buffer time

Pencils down: March 6

Eeeeee!

Mar. 6th, 2016 05:32 pm
brainwane: Sumana, April 2015, with shaved head. (bald)
I just called up Betsy Leondar-Wright (per the contact info on the Class Matters site) and told her I am gonna give a talk at LibrePlanet inspired by her piece on inessential weirdnesses and she was so jazzed! She probably won't be at my talk but she is so happy for the idea of inessential weirdnesses to be getting out! She might even have some time to look at my draft this week! She is so interested in spreading the word about Friends of Dennis and hearing more about the Birds of a Feather session I held at OSBridge that one time and OMG I feel like bouncing up and down. Eeeeee! Cross-generational and interdisciplinary activist conversation makes me super happy.
brainwane: My smiling face in front of a brick wall, May 2015. (Default)
"Comparing codes of conduct to copyleft licenses": written notes for a talk by Sumana Harihareswara, delivered in the Legal and Policy Issues DevRoom at FOSDEM, 31 January 2016 in Brussels, Belgium. Slightly better notes, including a photo, are now on my main blog. Video recording arriving around March 2016. Condensed notes available at Anjana Sofia Vakil's blog.


Good afternoon. I'm Sumana Harihareswara, and I represent myself, and my firm Changeset Consulting http://changeset.nyc/ . I'm here to discuss some things we can learn from comparing antiharassment policies, or community codes of conduct, to copyleft software licenses such as the GPL. I'll be laying out some major similarities and differences, especially delving into how these different approaches give us insight about common community attitudes and assumptions. And I'll lay out some lessons we can apply as we consider and advocate various sides of these issues, and potentially to apply to some other topics within free and open source software as well.

My notes will all be available online after this, so you don't have to scramble to write down my brilliant insights, or, more likely, links. And I don't have any slides. If you really need slides, I'm sorry, and if you're like, YES! then just bask in the next twenty-five minutes.

Text of my notes )

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