Oh Dear

Dec. 7th, 2016 05:30 pm
jjhunter: Watercolor of daisy with blue dots zooming around it like Bohr model electrons (Default)
[personal profile] jjhunter
I'm generally very facile with numbers. Unfortunate degree of utter exhaustion unlocked today: it took me four tries to punch in my conference code correctly for a call I was leading at work.

(Granted, I'd gotten through a full day's work beforehand, including some moderately complex data merging and a number of fiddlely coordinating to-do's in preparation for the call, and the call itself went fine, but that was an unnerving degree of short term memory scrambling - I had it written right in front of me in digit batches of 4-4-2.)

(no subject)

Dec. 7th, 2016 11:13 am
seekingferret: Photo of me with my 2012 Purim beard, with stripes shaven into it. (Default)
[personal profile] seekingferret
L'Amour de Loin composed by Kaija Saariaho, in Robert LePage's Met Opera production


The first opera staged at the Met in a hundred years that was composed by a woman!!! (YES, THE MET WAS ACTUALLY MORE PROGRESSIVE A CENTURY AGO THAN IT IS NOW.) No cookies for you, Peter Gelb.

I remain uncertain how I feel about it. Saariaho's musical palette tends toward microtonalism/spectralism, which is kind of a mixed bag for an opera. In terms of conjuring an atmosphere, setting a mood, her music is very effective. I wanted more melody, though. And I say that as someone whose favorite opera is atonal. I don't need melody in my opera, but I wanted it more in this one.

I'm also unsure how I feel about the story. There is plot, though not much of it- the French troubadour Joufre has given up his womanizing ways and devoted himself to writing brilliant (complex, ambiguous, microtonal) love songs in praise of a woman he has never met, across the sea- the perfect woman. Troubled by this change, his friends try to console him, but he is inconsolable until a pilgrim tells him that she has met the woman. The pilgrim becomes an inadvertent go-between, bringing word of this love from afar back and forth between the two until Joufre decides he must set sail and meet his true love, Clemence. Tragically, the sea voyage brings him near to death, and he dies shortly after setting eyes on her and confessing his love to her for the first time.

It's a vision of love I'm uncomfortable with. To my mind, love must be relational, it must be built in the interactions between people. Love from afar in this fashion does not make sense. It's also to a certain extent a vision of love that the opera expresses discomfort with, as in a fabulous aria where Clemence re-sings one of Jaufre's love songs dedicated to her and then goes through the litany of ways in which it fails to describe her, and wonders if it is possible for her to ever live up to it. This was my favorite moment in the opera. But in the final act, when the lovers meet at last and then Clemence comes to terms with her grief at losing him, this skepticism about love from afar is not present. It is a beautiful piece of music about grief and lost love, but it is anchored in the most crystalline bad-opera-love I've ever seen. Afterward, I compared the final Act to the last act of Wagner's Tristan und Isolde. The conclusion of L'Amour de Loin is mercifully shorter, but it is similar in its commitment to treating terrible, fixated non-relational love as being the most romantic thing in the world, and the destruction of that love as being the most tragic thing in the world.

The most striking thing about the opera was LePage's staging, which set millions of addressable RGB LEDs across the stage in ribbons and magnificently animated them as a constantly moving sea on which the action took place. Combined with Saariaho's tone painting, the effect was remarkably vivid, the kind of spectacle you go to the Met to see.

Complete Cardigan!

Dec. 7th, 2016 03:00 pm
terriko: (Default)
[personal profile] terriko
This is crossposted from Curiousity.ca, my personal maker blog. If you want to link to this post, please use the original link since the formatting there is usually better.

Remember this cardigan I started back in March? I almost made the Cardipalooza deadline in May, but abandoned it a bit shy of the deadline when I ran into problems and decided it would be better to take a break than to try to push for a deadline. I picked it up again now that it’s finally getting cool again, and I finally finished it last weekend.


Acorn Trail Sweater


Acorn Trail Sweater


The pattern is Acorn Trail. It’s a beautiful sweater, and I’ve found Amy Herzog’s sweater fitting books really interesting, so I was eager to try one of her patterns. With judicious use of a highlighter I didn’t even find the pattern too hard to follow despite the many possible adjustments. I did somehow make the body section longer than I intended and had to do a run for more yarn, but to be honest it’s a nice length and while you can spot that the last skein is slightly more grey if you look a the sleeve joins at the shoulder or in the button band, it’s not as bad as I first feared.


Acorn Trail Sweater


I thought I would prefer to do a pieced sweater because most of my knitting is on the go, and doing pieces meant I could still easily carry it around. But it turns out I’m not great at seaming and I don’t much enjoy it, and even while I was knitting I spent time wondering why I was making seams when I could just put things together in 3d in the first place. In the end, I *did* convert the sleeves to be knit in the round rather than flat because I couldn’t honestly think of any reason not to do so, but I did the rest of the pattern as written. Still, I found I was constantly sad I couldn’t try it on as I went and adjust it all more precisely, so I think next sweater I try may be a more seamless affair and probably top-down. The current leading candidate is Lush, but something else may well catch my eye before I get to making it. I’m guessing right now it’ll be after the 2017 Rose City Yarn Crawl before I’ll have time for a sweater again.


Acorn Trail Sweater


The yarn is Malabrigo Rios in Bobby Blue, which I picked up from For Yarn’s Sake. That was the first yarn store I visited when I moved here, I think! It’s very conveniently located next to the woodworking store in the same mall as the chocolate shop.


The yarn is soft and lovely and washable. I would totally use this again, although maybe not for a sweater since getting enough in one dye lot was hard even with For Yarn’s Sake’s fairly large collection. I did stripe it to even out the dye lots, but that last skein is still noticeable to my eye. The colour did bleed a bit when I washed and blocked it, but nothing dramatic, just enough that I’ll be careful if I decide to use the remainder in some colourwork.


Acorn Trail sweater detail


The buttons I picked up at Black Sheep at Orenco, and aren’t they cute? They’re probably a bit impractical since star buttons can be kind of finicky in knitting, but I liked the look of them and honestly, I mostly wear my cardigans open since work is pretty warm for sweaters. Although it did snow this week, so it’s cool outside!


Acorn Trail Sweater


Many of my knitwear photos are self portraits since my husband’s photographic passions are more about architecture and landscape than people. (I on the other hand, am mostly about people and flowers.) But he was kind enough to help with these and as always, the two of us working together results in much funnier expressions. He did a really nice job, although I cheated and gave him a 50mm prime lens so he had no choice but to be a bit more close up than he normally would be.


Acorn Trail Sweater


So that’s it! I’d guess that the sweater was under 2 months of work in total, but with a 6 month gap in the middle. Honestly, I thought it would take me longer! I’m pretty proud of my first me-sized sweater, and I’m sure it’ll be the first of many.


Acorn Trail Sweater

wired: Picture of me smiling (Default)
[personal profile] wired

I have some complicates thinks about Americans' views on consequences,sin, magical thinking, and privilege.

Thanks for the nudge, @brainwane.

One of the things I think is true about Americans as a whole is that we are really wedded to the narrative of people getting what they deserve. I suspect this is partially because of our Puritan/Protestant formative influences. If bad things happen to you, you must have sinned and brought them on yourself, or if not that, they are happening because God loves you so much He is testing you, ala Job. But in any case, you are responsible for the bad things that have happened to you. 

The more we believe this, the safer we feel, because if bad things happen for a reason, all we have to do is avoid the reason and then bad things won't happen. The example for this is if you are a woman who behaves virtuously, (for whatever definition) you won't be sexually assaulted or raped. If you are raped, you must have deserved it by your actions.

We find this immensely comforting, as long as we are not the victim in a situation, because it gives us a belief in our own power to affect our lives and outcomes. As long as I am a Virtuous Woman, I am safe, and as soon as someone is not safe, it's on them, it couldn't possibly touch us, that's over there and my continued right action will keep me safe. 

That's magical thinking. It is no more rational than the thousand other instances of magical thinking, like calling your beautiful child ugly so bad things won't notice them, or skipping cracks in the sidewalk (you ever wonder about the incidence of low back pain in primary childcarers, kids who walk on sidewalks, and the expressions of guilt?).

But because we've taken this magical thinking to such extraordinary lengths and embedded it so deeply in our culture, we don't see it anymore. We just assume that The Other has done something to deserve their misfortune, because if we look it in the face and see that they didn't, that means we are also at risk, and we just can't cope with that. Do you mean we live in an arbitrary and capricious world, and nothing I can do will keep me safe? Unacceptable!

I also think that the longer we go in life without something really bad happening to us, the more we invest in this theory, because we assume that bad things not happening to us means that our actions are obviously virtuous, and as long as we keep it up, we'll be fine, and why don't other people do this self-obvious thing? They should be more like me!

So if children need to get school district help to eat, obviously they or their parents should behave differently, so that the world treats them as well as a privileged white guy.

Privileged people fight really hard against the idea that misfortune is caused by something other than behavior, because it's terrifying to acknowledge anything else. And when something pops that bubble and misfortune happens, they cast about for SOME behavior that caused it, preferably behavior by someone else, because again, this behavior worked so well for so long, it must not be problematic.

Consequences are a malleable concept. We give children different consequences for the same behavior, based on their age, maturity, and caloric level. But everyone treats consequences as if they are handed out by a neutral force of nature. I lied and cheated and nothing bad happened? Lying and cheating must not be so bad, because there's almost no consequence. You got pregnant despite reasonable prevention? You deserve that consequence because your behavior was bad. 

It's hard to understand how people can be so unbelievably heartless and devoted to it, but when you realize they are locked into this worldview by fear, you begin to understand their level of attachment to the lie of sin and consequences. It's not right, but it makes more sense.
Sign: White Privilege: If you can't see it, you got it

(no subject)

Dec. 5th, 2016 05:17 pm
ghost_lingering: Minus prepares to hit the meteor out of the park (today I saved the world)
[personal profile] ghost_lingering
Drive-by essay recommendation: Trump: The Choice We Face by Masha Gessen

An essay that uses her own family's history of collaboration with authoritarian regimes to explore the line between collaboration and trying to do good even if it means compromising. I'm turning it over in my mind, but it dovetails with things I've been thinking recently about the legacy of WWII and European fascism; and questioning where the lines between survival, resistance, collaboration, and neutrality begin and end.

I've always believed that morality is a messy question; easy in theory and hard in practice. This is one of the few essays that I've read recently that understands the messiness of our decisions and the ways that logic can turn into justification; how a moral man can find himself making decisions that are immoral; how uncertain our actions are before we can look back and see them with 20/20 vision. How easy it is to be seduced by new normals.

(no subject)

Dec. 5th, 2016 09:43 am
copperbadge: (radiofreemondaaay)
[personal profile] copperbadge
Good morning everyone, and welcome to Radio Free Monday!

Ways to Give:

[tumblr.com profile] armadil-lauren is raising money to leave an abusive home; she is moving across the country to attend the university of her choice and join her sister, but her father is charging her for "living costs" and she will also need to pay fees to her university to attend, but can't get student loans for the school's lump-sum fees. You can read more here or donate directly via paypal to l-bow_dolphinz at hotmail.com.

[livejournal.com profile] celtprincess13 linked to a fundraiser for Tracy and Keith, whose son Logan recently died. Because he had Cerebral Palsy, they couldn't get life insurance for him, and are facing expected funeral expenses of around $9K. You can read more and donate to the funeral fundraiser here.

[livejournal.com profile] digitalwave has opened up this year's [livejournal.com profile] wish_list, where people can go to post things they need, from money to help with housing to just wishes for good news years, fics, and postcards. You can get more info here, read how to participate here, and find clickable banners here.

Anon linked to a fundraiser for Jen and Dani, who have been dealing with illness and injuries, which insurance has not fully covered. They're fundraising to cover medical bills and get back on their feet; you can read more and support the fundraiser here.

[tumblr.com profile] dreamwaffles's summer job just ended and she's trying to make ends meet until she fand land another one. She has a donation page up here but is also selling beaded jewelery through Etsy; you can check out Saxifrage Designs and make a purchase here.

[tumblr.com profile] rilee16 is still struggling to cover medical expenses after two head injuries last year, and hasn't been cleared to return to work, thus can't earn money to cover basic living costs, let alone the bills they've received. You can read more and help out here.

[livejournal.com profile] editrx has been struggling to keep her indy bookstore afloat for this past year, and on top of her troubles there, she's now been the subject of a violent assault by her housemate. She's dealing with mounting medical bills and trauma from the assault and needs a lawyer to ensure her attacker is charged properly and convicted. You can read more and give here, send a giftcard for groceries (to editrx@gmail.com) or support Starcat Books by purchasing here.


Activism:

[tumblr.com profile] danceswchopstck linked to an online protest petition against Rex Tillerson, CEO of ExxonMobil, being appointed Secretary of State. You can read more and join the protest here. They offer the option to add your name even if you're not in the US, so international folks concerned about putting the head of a huge oil company in such a massive position of power can add their name as well.


And this has been Radio Free Monday! Thank you for your time. You can post items for my attention at the Radio Free Monday submissions form or via email at copperbadge at gmail dot com. If you're not sure how to proceed, here is a little more about what I do and how you can help (or ask for help!). If you're new to fundraising, you may want to check out my guide to fundraising here.

A Long Way To A Small Angry Planet

Dec. 5th, 2016 10:54 pm
alias_sqbr: (happy dragon)
[personal profile] alias_sqbr
A fluffier, less morally ambiguous Farscape/Firefly-ish "found family of misfits have adventures in space" story where everyone is nice and there's a very obvious attempt at inclusiveness and diversity, including POC, queer, and disabled characters in significant roles getting to be fully rounded and happy. It's very comforting and light but still has enough narrative tension and plot to be engaging. Also, there's AIs. Overall I quite enjoyed it!

EDIT: After ranting to a friend my issues boil down to (a) It feeling pointedly Progressive while actually having a bunch of unfortunate implications (b) the author wanting the heroes to be Good People Who Do The Right Thing to an extent that felt morally and intellectually lazy especially given the author's narrow vision of what "good people" can look like.

But it rubbed me the wrong way 'progressive' speculative fiction often does )

So this is terrifying

Dec. 5th, 2016 06:05 am
giandujakiss: (Default)
[personal profile] giandujakiss
Google, democracy and the truth about internet search
Here’s what you don’t want to do late on a Sunday night. You do not want to type seven letters into Google. That’s all I did. I typed: “a-r-e”. And then “j-e-w-s”. Since 2008, Google has attempted to predict what question you might be asking and offers you a choice. And this is what it did. It offered me a choice of potential questions it thought I might want to ask: “are jews a race?”, “are jews white?”, “are jews christians?”, and finally, “are jews evil?”

Are Jews evil? It’s not a question I’ve ever thought of asking. I hadn’t gone looking for it. But there it was. I press enter. A page of results appears. This was Google’s question. And this was Google’s answer: Jews are evil. Because there, on my screen, was the proof: an entire page of results, nine out of 10 of which “confirm” this....

Every time someone likes one of these posts on Facebook or visits one of these websites, the scripts are then following you around the web. And this enables data-mining and influencing companies like Cambridge Analytica to precisely target individuals, to follow them around the web, and to send them highly personalised political messages. This is a propaganda machine. It’s targeting people individually to recruit them to an idea. It’s a level of social engineering that I’ve never seen before. They’re capturing people and then keeping them on an emotional leash and never letting them go.”

Cambridge Analytica, an American-owned company based in London, was employed by both the Vote Leave campaign and the Trump campaign....

Steve Bannon, founder of Breitbart News and the newly appointed chief strategist to Trump, is on Cambridge Analytica’s board and it has emerged that the company is in talks to undertake political messaging work for the Trump administration. It claims to have built psychological profiles using 5,000 separate pieces of data on 220 million American voters.

Question

Dec. 4th, 2016 08:36 pm
srukle: (Default)
[personal profile] srukle
Could you create a robot that is always uncertain? How would you measure its uncertainty? 
raven: subway sign in black and white, text: "Times Square / 42 Street station" (stock - times square)
[personal profile] raven
I got up before 10am today, something which I have not done in days and days, and went out to brunch with a friend at a place by the Serpentine. I walked back from Knightsbridge to Covent Garden, through freezing, diamond-brilliant cold, under a cloudless sky.

And you know, it turns out London is a beautiful, ancient city. I went through three of the royal parks - allodial land; held without tenure, without mark, for eight centuries - and along past Hatchards, where a hundred people were queueing up to get their books signed by Tim Peake; and through Piccadilly Circus, which is currently hosting an exhibition in praise of Frank Pick, a shy, unassuming lawyer who lived a shy unassuming life at the start of the last century; who believed that as the London Underground belonged to the city, and all the millions of people who used it, every aspect of it should be a work of public art. I bought a book and a cup of coffee and I did some work in a cafe like the ghastly cliché of a writer I am, and I saw the sun begin to set over Hampstead Heath with the skyline glittering behind.

And though tha sinn anns an dùbhlachd, and it is so very dark - not forever. Nothing lasts forever, except this place that we live in.

(no subject)

Dec. 4th, 2016 03:05 pm
skygiants: Jadzia Dax lounging expansively by a big space window (daxanova)
[personal profile] skygiants
In last week's resurrected You're Beautiful costume polls, our favorite crossdressing nun Go Mi Nam pulled out her very first victory. The audience has spoken: the elfin poncho of woe is this winter's must-have accessory!



Congratulations, Go Mi Nam, and enjoy your victory while you rest on your laurels this episode; you earned it.

Top five You're Beautiful episode 8 costumes under the cut )

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 58


And the ultimate most fabulous costume of episode 8 is...

View Answers

Jeremy's commitment to layers
16 (27.6%)

Stylist Wang's commitment to hair and makeup
9 (15.5%)

He Yi's commitment to matching her shoes and her purse
3 (5.2%)

Jeremy's commitment to royalty
17 (29.3%)

Tae Kyung's commitment to GLAMOUR
13 (22.4%)

Winter cards

Dec. 4th, 2016 12:54 pm
were_duck: Ellen Ripley from Alien looking pensively to the right in her space helmet (Default)
[personal profile] were_duck
If you would like to receive mail this holiday season from me, please fill out this google form or message me!

Newly Archived Fanfic

Dec. 4th, 2016 04:11 pm
copperbadge: (Default)
[personal profile] copperbadge
I went through my “not yet archived” tag this morning and archived the majority of them. Nothing “new” in the sense that it’s all been on my tumblr, but if you’d like to see them on AO3, they are now there!  

Each title is a link, but for LJ/DW users where this crossposts, the link is also in parentheses after each blurb. 

Nice Work If You Can Get It: A coda to “Ain’t Nobody’s Business If I Do”, in which Steve reconsiders his policy against being a Kept Man.( http://ift.tt/2gVgaLr )

The Exhibit: Set in the Izzyverse; Steve and Bucky chaperone Izzy’s class field trip to see the Captain America exhibit, and discuss their legacy. ( http://ift.tt/2fZHyn1 )

The Vice-President’s Snowball Initiative: Set in the Leader Of The Free World universe, regarding Steve’s love of a good snowball fight. ( http://ift.tt/2gVirGI )

The Buche De Noel Job: A short coda to the Cyborg Arm Job universe, where Bucky is the fourth member of the new Leverage International. ( http://ift.tt/2fZIfwG )

The DIY Family Job: Eliot Spencer stole a baby, but in true Leverage fashion, that’s the least of their problems. ( http://ift.tt/2fWrzem ) 

A Taste Of Vinegar: The Leverage crew invades Nero Wolfe’s brownstone, trying to figure out why Wolfe is after Eliot. Turns out Wolfe just wants a recipe. ( http://ift.tt/2gViyCh )

from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2fZIg3X
via IFTTT

Uh huh

Dec. 3rd, 2016 11:50 pm
sasha_feather: Daredevil in a suit (Daredevil)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Today my roommate had a party for her birthday. It was lovely; it involved reading books and passages from books out loud to the group. Some were children's books. Someone read from Alice in Wonderland; we passed around a book of tongue twisters by Dr. Suess.

Someone brought a joke book, Plato and Platypus walk into a bar: understanding philosophy through jokes. At first I thought, what a good idea, a joke book! But in a mixed group that don't know each other well, in the afternoon-- maybe not.

One of the jokes made me very clearly feel like the only queer person in the room.

An old cowboy goes into a bar and orders a drink. As he sits
there sipping his whiskey, a young lady sits down next to him. She
turns to the cowboy and asks him, “Are you a real cowboy?”

He replies, “Well, I’ve spent my whole life on the ranch, herding
horses, mending fences, and branding cattle, so I guess I am.”
She says, “I’m a lesbian. I spend my whole day thinking about
women. As soon as I get up in the morning, I think about
women. When I shower or watch TV, everything seems to make
me think of women.”

A little while later, a couple sits down next to the old cowboy
and asks him, “Are you a real cowboy?”
He replies, “I always thought I was, but I just found out I’m a
lesbian.”
(this is directly quoted from the PDF of the book

Interesting, the woman who brought this book also told a joke involving engineers, and said before she told that one she surveyed the room for who is an engineer to see who the joke would affect. Uh huh.

p.s. I don't feel well today; not sure what it is but dang

Laptops against fascism

Dec. 3rd, 2016 07:52 pm
jewelfox: A portrait of a foxgryphon with a beak, black fur, magenta hair, fox ears, and a neckband with a large jewel on it. (Default)
[personal profile] jewelfox

If this is what “Democracy” looks like in the 20th century–Nazis throwing their Sieg Heil in a public building in Washington DC to celebrate the election of a Nazi President…then you can count me out.

Both my grandfathers went to war and risked their lives to keep people like this from ruling the world.

If this [is] America now…then “America” and I are now at war. Which is pretty scary, because America has the largest and most powerful military in the history of the world…and all I’ve got is this laptop.

Oh well.

-- Arinn Dembo, We Are At War

"America" has always been a piece of crap, genocidal, white supremacist settler state. Some of us have been dealing with this America for our whole lives. We didn't have the choice of whether or not to go to war with it, because it declared war on us.

(no subject)

Dec. 3rd, 2016 06:25 pm
skygiants: storybook page of a duck wearing a pendant, from Princess Tutu; text 'mukashi mukashi' (mukashi mukashi)
[personal profile] skygiants
A month or two ago, I went to the Yiddish Book Center for an archives conference that happened to be hosted there.

The idea of collecting Yiddish books was first conceived of by Aaron Lansky in the late 1970s, when Yiddish books were being thrown away by the thousands as a generation of Yiddish-speaking immigrants were starting to die and leave their possessions to children who didn't see a point in keeping a lot of books around that they couldn't read. Lansky -- at that time a graduate student in Eastern European Jewish Studies who was having a near-impossible time actually getting his hands on any Yiddish books to read -- put out a call in his hometown that if people were thinking of throwing away their Yiddish books, they should send them to him instead. Pretty soon, the story goes, his parents called to tell him that he had to figure out another solution because they were fairly sure the second floor of their house was about to cave in from the weight of the books that people were passing onto them. The Book Center, as it now exists, seeks out Yiddish books and digitizes them; sorts titles to identify unique ones; provides copies of Yiddish books to other libraries; runs a translation program to print Yiddish titles in English; and runs cultural and educational programs, among a bunch of other stuff.

I can't speak Yiddish -- it's a language lost to me by several generations -- but I've been starting to look into classes; I'd give a lot to be able to read Yiddish books. Until then, the next-best thing is reading about Yiddish books, so I put Aaron Lansky's Outwitting History: The Amazing Adventures of a Man Who Rescued a Million Yiddish Books on library reserve.

Anway, last weekend [personal profile] aquamirage and I went to go see the Broadway production of Fiddler on the Roof, and it was amazing, and all my Yid-lit feelings came roaring to the surface again. I came home and immediately picked up Outwitting History, which turns out to be a relatively light and cheerful collection of anecdotes about salvaging a language and culture that has at several points throughout the 20th century been the target of brutal and deliberate extinction. This is entirely in keeping with the general tone of Yiddish literature, which is often funny and depressing and uplifting and pessimistic all at once. (After seeing Fiddler, [personal profile] aquamirage said, 'I knew the whole plot but I didn't know how funny it was going to be!') So, you know. Come for the cute stories about enthusiastic elderly Jews stuffing the faces of bemused book-collectors with kugel and borscht, but stay for stuff like the first shipment of Yiddish books back to the Soviet Union after the fall of the Iron Curtain.

the other thing about Moana

Dec. 3rd, 2016 04:02 pm
metaphortunate: (Default)
[personal profile] metaphortunate
And the other thing about Moana is, it paints this, like, eye-wateringly idyllic picture of a pre-industrial society, just SO beautiful with those swelling chords and Lin-Manuel Miranda's catchy-ass lyrics dragging you headlong into it, and then casually, about two-thirds of the way through, oh yeah, infanticide is totally a thing, too.  o.O

Reading shit like this

Dec. 3rd, 2016 04:06 pm
giandujakiss: (Default)
[personal profile] giandujakiss
absolutely kills me.  There are so many ways our country is horrifically, dramatically fucked up - and with Clinton, we had a chance of actually moving the ball forward.  And now with Trump, it's like, how can I even contemplate extreme racism and brutality in prisons, because it'll be all we can do to keep the right to vote and prevent a nuclear war?
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